Greek gold
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Greek gold Jewelry from the age of Alexander by Herbert Hoffmann

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Published by von Zabern in Mainz/Rhein .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Alexander -- III, -- King of Macedonia.,
  • Jewelry, Greek -- Exhibitions.,
  • Goldwork, Ancient -- Exhibitions.

Book details:

Edition Notes

Statement(By) Herbert Hoffmann (and) Patricia F. Davidson. Edited by Axel von Saldern.
ContributionsDavidson, Patricia F., Boston. Museum of Fine Arts., Brooklyn Institute of Arts and Sciences. Museum., Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, Richmond.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsNK7107
The Physical Object
Paginationxi, 311 p. with illus. and front ;
Number of Pages311
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL21323099M

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Masterfully handmade Gospel Book Cover used by the priests in the Greek Orthodox Churches for the liturgy. The Cover etchings in silver and gold of the four Evangelists (Mark, Luke, John and Matthew) as well as the Crucifixion of Christ on the front and the Resurrection on the back. Hand made in Greece of top quality gold plated brass in the traditional manner. The engravings, mainly cameo, but sometimes intaglio, depict scarabs at first and then scenes from Greek mythology, often with heroic personages called out in Etruscan. The gold setting of the bezel bears a border design, such as cabling. Coins. Etruscan-minted Language family: Tyrsenian?, Etruscan. Mar 27,  · Overall, Reading Greek Tragedy is a wealth of very fine knowledge about those plays that it does address, but it falls woefully short of actually addressing the topic of Greek tragedy as a whole. While it is a good jumping-off point to begin a further exploration of Greek tragedy, as a stand-alone book Reading Greek Tragedy it is simply chevreschevalaosta.com by: Ancient Greek coins are one of the most popular ancient coin types to collect. Many different kinds of coins are considered ancient Greek coins, including Ptolemaic bronzes and Athenian silver Owls. They span hundreds of years and thousands of miles across the ancient world. Own an ancient Greek coin, and you’ll truly hold history in your hands!

The book is made from 6 sheets of 24 carat gold, bound together with rings. The plates are written in Etruscan characters, and also depicted is a horse, horseman, a Siren, a lyre, and soldiers. The book was donated to Bulgaria’s National History Museum in Sofia, by an anonymous 87 year old donor. Midas (/ ˈ m aɪ d ə s /; Greek: Μίδας) is the name of at least three members of the royal house of Phrygia. The most famous King Midas is popularly remembered in Greek mythology for his ability to turn everything he touched into gold. This came to be called the golden touch, or the Midas touch. Get this from a library! Greek gold: jewellery of the classical world. [Dyfri Williams; Jack Ogden] -- "The consummate mastery of Greek goldsmiths and the beauty of their designs elevated jewelry in the Classical period to glorious artistic heights. This volume presents nearly of the finest. Edition Notes Includes bibliographical references (p. ). Catalog of an exhibition of Greek gold jewelry held at the British Museum, London, June October 23, and at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, December 2, March 24,

Search the world's most comprehensive index of full-text books. My library. Oct 29,  · According to the poet Pindar (– BCE), to the Greek mind gold has an allegorical significance, meaning the radiance of light, good fortune, blessedness, and all the fairest and the best. In Babylonia, gold was the metal of the sun. Silver and Bronze Ages. Masterfully handmade Gospel Book Cover used by the priests in the Greek Orthodox Churches for the liturgy. The Cover is covered in in red velvet and bears etchings in silver and gold of the four Evangelists (Mark, Luke, John and Matthew) as well as the Crucifixion of Christ on the front and the Resurrection on the back. Hand made in Greece of top quality gold plated brass in the traditional. Presents nearly of the finest surviving pieces of jewelry made between the fifth and the early third century B.C. Drawn from the collections of the Hermitage, St. Petersburg, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, and the British Museum, London, the works in this book represent jewelry produced throughout the Greek world.